The Oxford Bible...

Click here to receive an illustrated brochure and full details about how to acquire a copy of the facsimile edition of The Oxford Bible.

While many examples of mediaeval illuminated books have survived, the names of the illustrators are not usually known to us. One exception, however, is an artist who was active in 13th-century Oxford, William de Brailes, who stands out among the masters of early Gothic art not only because we know his name but also by his highly original and lively style.

De Brailes illustrated the richly illuminated cycle of biblical scenes, known as the Oxford Bible pictures, and presented his client with a sumptuous series of 31 miniatures that must have met the contemporary taste for Gothic art. The three-dimensional rendering of drapery on the slim, elegant figures was skilfully executed using black and white outlines against burnished gold.

The binding, unusually, is inset with the finely carved ivory plaque decorated on both sides with the Nativity on the front, and the Crucifixion on the back. This masterpiece of Gothic sculpture was produced in the late 14th century in the Rhineland area of Germany.

This faithful facsimile of the Oxford Bible pictures is published in a limited edition of 980 copies and it brings together the 31 richly illustrated folios which are split between the Musée Marmottan in Paris and the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore. The facsimile is bound in a replica of the original with its carved plate and the two clasps and it is housed within a hand-made leather case, set with an acrylic window.

A commentary by William Noel, Keeper of Manuscripts at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, provides the key to the Oxford Bible pictures offers a fascinating insight into the early Gothic period.

Click here to receive an illustrated brochure and full details about how to acquire a copy of the facsimile edition of The Oxford Bible.

The Oxford Bible Facsimile Edition

The Oxford Bible Facsimile Publication

The Oxford Bible Facsimile